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DAY 19 - Geraint Thomas, the Super-Domestique

Geraint Thomas MBE, is the Welsh Pro rider who has been described as Chris Froome's super domestic in this year's Tour de France. Along with Richie Porte they have provided Froome with incredible pace setting, protection in the mountains and managed to fend off attacks from Froome's main rivals to make sure his yellow jersey is defended. By riding so well Thomas has found himself in 4th position in the GC, and with 2 more stages in the mountains there is a distinct possibility he could find himself on the podium in Paris. At 29 Geraint isn't new to the sport, but his committed part in Team Sky this year has thrown him into the spotlight as one of the best...

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DAY 18 - Top tips for climbing mountains

Todays stage of the tour is deemed to be the hardest of the whole 2015 race. Its 186.5km of non- stop ascending and descending, taking in 7 categorised climbs, one of which (the Col du Glandon) is a HC. The Pro riders in the Tour make climbing mountains look easy, they seem to go up hill the same speed as I go down. The sad reality is that for us mere mortals climbing a Col is a much tougher business. We decided to speak to Chris Bland from Allons Y Pyrenees to see if he had any top tips about climbing. Chris spends the Summer months leading groups around the Pyrenees as part of his cycling training camp business. He knows the roads...

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DAY 17 - The King of the Mountains

The polka dot jersey or 'King of the Mountains' classification goes to the rider with the most points gained on categorised climbs throughout the Tour de France. Each key climb within the race is ranked over 5 categories, from 1-4 (4 being the hardest) and the ultimate Hors Category, which is so tough it's un-categorised. Prior to the stage the riders are given the below information which categorises the climbs on each stage so they know where the points can be gained, and can work out how many are at stake at each point.   Mountain climbs were introduced in the Tour de France in 1910, when the route went over the Col d'aubisque and the Col de Tourmalet in...

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21 DAYS OF THE TOUR - Our best reads of motivating cycling and sports memoirs

So as today is a day of rest and recovery for the Peleton we thought we would take some time to share with you our favourite holiday reads (cycling and sports related of course!) These are all books we have read and keep coming back to time and time again, either to re-read or reference back to. All of them are different in their own way, but all are inspired and thought provoking reads! So if you are looking for some great reading over the summer, and want some motivation to get out on your bike more, run better, or simply be a fitter and better person then work your way through our list.   1 - The Rider by...

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DAY 16 - The expert descenders!

One of the skills that make a top road cyclist is not only the ability to climb mountains, but also the ability to descend them. Today’s stage in the Tour de France has the longest descents of all the stages, where riders will reach speeds in excess of 70mph, as they lean into the bends trying to find the most efficient route down. Unlike climbing, one of the biggest issues with descending is that it’s virtually impossible to practice the big descents prior to the races, so the riders tend to be racing blind. On recces of the stages in the lead up weeks to the tour the riders will check out the mountain stages so as to know what...

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